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Williams Bay Residence | Renaissance Roofing, Inc.

Williams Bay Copper Replacement Copper Custom Radius Standing Seam Panels Custom Copper Cladding

For aesthetic reasons, this Lake Geneva area homeowner contracted Renaissance Roofing to replace all old, poorly fabricated copper with new pre patinated copper on their slate roof home.  Renaissance had done previous restoration work on the Williams Bay home and boathouse and the owner knew they could count on Renaissance’s expertise with copper.

Copper Dormers – Remove slate and existing copper cladding, fabricate and install new pre patinated copper cladding and reinstall the original slate.

Gutters, Downspouts and Collector Boxes – Remove existing copper gutters, copper downspouts and copper collector boxes, fabricate and install new pre patinated copper gutters, copper gooseneck design downspouts and custom copper [...]

Renaissance Roofing, in continuation of pursuing excellence, has recently welcomed a new Director of Safety to the team.

Nick Atkinson comes to us from the mechanical trades serving as a Safety Director for several large commercial contractors for 5 years. Nick is Board Certified by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals and graduated from Northern Illinois University with a degree in Industrial Engineering focusing on environmental health and safety. Nick was a Sergeant in the Marine Corps, and enjoys all things outdoors, riding motorcycles, and golf.

Nick’s vision for Renaissance Roofing lends itself to the Special Forces mantra: “By, With, and Through”. Creating leaders and investing in Foremen to carry Renaissance Roofing into our goals of Safety Excellence. We utilize our leaders to foster a culture of safety, provide a learning environment for our crews, and to accept nothing less [...]

After more than two years, the restoration of the Cascade County Courthouse in Great Falls, Montana is complete.

Restoration of the 115-year old, three-story English Renaissance Revival structure included replacement of the copper dome, architectural copper, flat seam and batten seam copper roofs, curved window sash reproduction and replacement and repoint and repair of the sandstone chimney interior and exterior masonry.

The work by Renaissance Roofing was completed entirely with our own forces and the courthouse remained open during the entire restoration.

 

The historic roof restoration of the Anderson Arts Center in Kenosha Wisconsin, 40 miles south of Milwaukee, was performed in 2019 to protect the Estate against the brutal Lake Michigan and Kenosha, Wisconsin weather.

Designed by Ralph Milman and Archibald Mortphet and built for James Anderson, an executive of the American Brass Company and his wife, Janet Lance Anderson, granddaughter of the Simmons Mattress Company founder, the French Renaissance Revival style house has over 9,000 square feet of living space with more than 30 rooms. The clay roof tiles are complimented by the stone and stucco exterior walls and dormers trimmed in wood with a copper roofing system.  Construction began in 1929 and was completed in 1931.

The restoration processes involved the meticulous removal of the 30,000 pieces of Ludowici-Celadon Brittany Style Shingle Tiles. Each special trim tile was numbered and cataloged so it would be reinstalled in the exact location from where it was [...]

At Renaissance Roofing we value safety above all else, and our record backs it up. Safety Director Collin Maas ensures every project is set up and completed in a safe manner, and last year we achieved a workers’ compensation insurance Experience Modification Rating (EMR) of .70. The industry average is 1.0, which means our proven history of safe work allows for cheaper insurance rates — savings that we are able to pass along to customers (for more info on the value of a low EMR, click here).

As part of our culture of safety, we participate in the annual OSHA National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction. On Monday, May 6th, Collin held training sessions with our roofing crews to refocus on the important safety protocols in place that ensure every Renaissance Roofing team member returns home safely after a day of work.

Just a few weeks ago in the upper Midwest, we received over 12 inches of heavy snow in just one storm. It seems an appropriate time to share the important role of snow and ice guards in roofing systems where snowfall is an annual challenge.

Roofing materials such as slate, metal/copper, tile or synthetic materials will not absorb moisture as snow piles up, which leads to the danger of falling ice and snow. Sunlight, gravity and a warm attic will force the heavy snow off your roof in one dangerous event. Decks, sidewalks, landscaping, and other important property and areas of human traffic need protection from these dangers.

One important note: Snow and ice guards should not be installed on asphalt shingle low-slope roofs due to the risk of causing snow dams.

Snow and ice guards work by introducing barriers that impede the avalanche effect, preventing large amounts of snow from falling off the roof. [...]

A large and complex roof restoration project is underway in Joplin, Missouri, where two Victorian-era houses will be repurposed to create the Joplin Historical Neighborhoods living history museum. Thanks to the generosity of the David and Debra Humphreys family, the Schifferdecker and Zelleken houses will have new roofing systems that will utilize the same Buckingham Slate that topped the original structures.

Quarried in Virginia, Buckingham Slate is a durable and aesthetically beautiful material that can last up to 150 years. “What makes these tiles unique to other slates — and they are considered to be the Rolls-Royce of slate in America — is there is mica that is in the content of the slate that gives it a glisten or a sparkle that sets it apart from a Vermont slate or a Pennsylvania slate,” said Tony Raleigh, Historic Roofing Specialist at Renaissance Roofing.

 

What are the key factors in determining whether you should repair or replace your Cedar Shake Roof?

Missing Shakes, Broken Shakes or Rotten Shakes: If you only have a few shakes that are missing or broken you can likely have those pieces repaired and the roof will function properly. Exception: Your roof is shedding numerous shakes on a regular basis and the replacement of these is shakes is becoming tedious and predictable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My wood shake roof is leaking. An isolated leak or two is not a problem that should [...]

Restoration of the copper dome and roof at the 115-year old courthouse is Cascade County, Montana is nearing completion, and residents are enjoying the beautiful new skyline as sunny weather returns.

As reported in the Great Falls Tribune, the project is expected to wrap up this April despite weather challenges over the last six weeks. The crew from Renaissance Roofing has been working on site for nearly two years, and is pleased to finally see the results of their craftsmanship. Project Manager Lon Gorsch said, “The guys are very proud of their work. They’re happy with how it’s turning out. The weather has been really rough… it was very difficult to work up there.”

The courthouse was built in 1903, and a 1913 article in the same Great Falls Tribune noted that “The Cascade County Courthouse has been the pride of the [...]

Attention Homeowners!

Winter rains when snow and ice dams are still present will likely cause significant problems to existing roofing systems. All sloped roofing systems are built on the concept that they are able to shed water. Sloped roofing systems are not waterproof, they are water shedding. So when we have rain that is dammed by snow and ice, it will find a way into the roofing system and into the house.

Stop Gap Measures
Unfortunately, when these conditions already exist, damage is likely. There is little proactive action that can be done at this point other than clearing snow and ice from roof and gutter systems. The immediate goal is to provide a path for water to escape the roof and move away from your home. We offer a quick, efficient solution [...]

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