Detroit Roofing Tile Company

Detroit Roofing Tile Company
“If it is’nt Tile it is’nt a Roof” – Detroit Roofing Tile Company

Detroit Roofing Tile Company

 

The Detroit Roofing Tile Co.

 

 

 

 

 

Is located on Springwells, a suburb of Detroit, where the company owns large deposits of clay peculiarly adapted to the manufacture of roofing tile. A spur of the Michigan Central R.R. is laid into the yards thus assuring prompt and ample shipping facilities.

ROOFING TILE

The manufacture of roofing tile originated in Europe, where tile roofs are now universally used for all classes of buildings. Since its introduction into this country its use has become very general and as there is no other material available that will stand the test of time, these tiles must inevitably become the roofing material of the future.

ATTRACTIVENESS

A tile roof is by far the handsomest and most attractive roof of any material known.  And on account of its beautiful colors and shapes created by the master minds of the architectural profession, it is entirely unnecessary for the sake of the roof’s expression, to adorn it with numerous towers, dormers and like features. Thus greatly reducing the cost of building.

DURABILITY

The durability of a well burned tile is beyond question. We find articles of burned clay in a perfect state of preservation in the oldest ruins.  Tile roofs in the old countries which have been laid for centuries past, are as good as today as when first exposed to the elements. In European countries where tile is universally used and the industry best understood, the best practice demands that the tile be well burned but not vitrified, so as to absorb the inevitable dampness which is so annoyous besides destructive to  a building.

NON-CONDUCTOR

A tile roof is a non-conductor, thereby insuring protection against lightning.  A very valuable feature for country buildings, where there isn’t ample fire protection.

ROOFS

Roof pitch may be as low as one-fourth and from that to any desired pitch.

SHEATHED ROOF OR CLOSED CONSTRUCTION

For closed construction the roof should be sheathed the same as for slate, and the sheathing covered with one thickness of heavy roofing felt, desired by plaster lath nailed up and down the roof 24 inches apart: on these are nailed the 1×2 strips on which the tile are hung  and wired as shown by Fig.95. On each side of the valleys a 1×2 inch strip should be nailed on parallel to the valley and about six inches from the center. See figs. 82,83,84,85 and 86. Every tile in the eaves and gable courses and every alternate tile elsewhere should be wired with No.18 copper wire.

OPEN WOOD CONSTRUCTION

Where the tiles are left accessible from below they may be laid on strips without sheathing or paper. See figs.94 & 101. Our interlocking tiles so laid are water proof but to protect against dust and dry snow the locks should be reinforced by using oakum. Every tile in the eaves and gable coping and every other tile elsewhere should be wired with No.18 copper wire.

OPEN STEEL CONSTRUCTION

On factories, power plants, freight sheds and like structures, tile may be laid on steel or iron purlins. See Figs: 87,88,89,90,91,92 and 93.

PURLIN SPACING

Purlin spacing should be obtained before placing strips or purlins as it varies with different patterns and colors.

VALLEY AND HIP TILE

Valley and hip tile may be cut and filled before burning at the reasonable charge. When valley tile are not filled before burning they must be pointed up with cement mortar colored to match the tile.

VALLEY GUTTER TILE

Made if desired.

RIDGE ROLLS AND CRESTING

When closed ends are wanted it should be specified which end is desired closed.

VENTILATION RIDGES

We make ventilators for all our ridge rolls.

GRADUATED TILE

Graduated tile are made to order in all patterns. They should not be laid on open construction.

COLOR AND GLAZES

Our red semi-glazed is very attractive and the color generally desired. We make a complete line of full glazes including brown, yellow, green, white and black. 

GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS

  1. Sheathing:  cover roof with material sheathing.
  2. Felt: lay one thickness of good heavy roofing felt on sheathing. Fasten roofing felt by plaster laths nailed up and down the roof 24 inches center.
  3. Wood Purlins: Securely nail 7/8 inch by 2 inch wood strips over entire roof, spaced to snugly fit tile. (The distance including the upper and lower courses vary with pattern of tile)
  4. Valleys and flashings (Closed Construction): on each side of valley a one inch by two inch strip is to be nailed, same to be nailed on plaster lath, parallel with and about six inches center of valley. See Figs. 82, 83 and 85. Valley metal to cover valley and one inch by two inch strip and extend about four inches beyond the strip on each side of valley. The valley metal beyond the strip to lie under roofing felt. Roofing felt well lapped by the felt on both adjoining roofs to be laid under valley metal. Where valleys empty unto the roof above the eaves valley flashing must continue full width to cover one course of tile below.
  5. Wall, dormer, chimney and skylight flashing—At the side walls, dormers, chimneys and skylights a gutter two inches wide is to be laid under tiles by means of a one inch by two inch strip places two inches from and parallel with the wall. The gutter to be fourteen inches wide. Commencing at the farther end of the side strip the metal is to be turned up one-half inch and continue through the gutter and extend eight inches high against the wall. The upper edge of metal to be counterflashed with a lap of at least four and one-half inches. (See Figs. 86 and 96)
  6. Saddles—Place metal saddles on the back of all chimneys running up chimney eight inches and extending six inches under tile strip above.
  7. Valley tiles—Valley tiles not filled to be pointed from the outside with a good quality of cement mortar colored to match tile.
  8. Fastening tile—Every  tile in the eaves and gable courses and every alternate tile elsewhere to be fastened with No. 18 copper wire.
  9. Cut valley—Valley to be cut before burning.
  10. Cut and filled valleys—Valleys to be cut and filled before burning.
  11. Hip tiles—Hip tiles to be cut before burning.
  12. Hip board—A one inch board placed on edge to be nailed on hip rafter to receive hip rolls.
  13. Laying hip rolls—Nail each piece of hip roll to hip board. Lay cement mortar along the edges of cut tile to join them against hip board to form bed for the edge of ridge roll. Point up the joints and edges after hip is set. The larger opening to be filled with tile chips and mortar.
  14. Laying ridge rolls—Bed edges of ridge rolls in cement mortar and point up edges and joints with same material, colored to match tile. (Never fill the inside space of ridge and hip rolls with pointing material.)
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 1-5 which show Tile D-1, D-2, and D-3. Along with Gable Coping for D-1 and Half Tile for D-1. The Tile illustrations give additional information such as weight per square, number per square, and the Purlin Spacing and the Purlin Eaves Course. The Gable Coping for D-1 gives information on the Depth of flange, Made in lefts and rights, and the weight per foot. Lastly, Half Tile for D-1 is used to break joints.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 6-13 which show Tile D-4 and D-5. Also shown are D-4 Gable Coping, D-5 Gable Coping, D-5 Eave Tile, and Half Tile. The Tile illustrations give additional information such as weight per square, number per square, and the Purlin Spacing and the Purlin Eaves Course.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 14-21 which shows Tile D-6. Also shown are D-5 Top Tile, D-5 Closed Eave Gable Coping, D-5 Top Gable Coping, D-5 Open Eave Gable Coping, D-5 Eave Gable Coping, D-5 Gable Coping, and D-5 Gable Coping for Top Course. The D-6 Tile illustration gives additional information such as weight per square, number per square, and laid 6 in. to weather.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 22-29 which shows Tile D-7 and Tile D-8. Also shown are D-7 Eave Tile, D-8 Eave Tile, and numerous other tile illustrations. The D-7 and D-8 Tile illustration gives additional information such as weight per square and number per square.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 30-37 which shows D-5 Graduated Tile for Circular work, Cut and Closed Valleys for D-5 tile, Cut Valleys for D-1 Tile, Corner for D-6 Tile used on perpendicular work, and D-6 Tile with Round End 6 1/2 in. x 14 in.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company Hip Rolls
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 38-45 which shows H-25-31 Hip Rolls. Each of the illustrations give detailed information, such as length to weather, weight per ft, and the inside with, small end.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company Hip Roll Starters
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 46-52 which show Hip Roll Starters.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company Ridge Roll and Cresting
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 53-58 which show Ridge Roll and Cresting. Each illustration shows at least two of the following; the length to weather, inside span, outside height, weight per ft.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 59-64 which show Wall Coping and Deck Moulds. Each illustration shows at least two of the following; the length to weather, outside height, and weight per ft.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 65-70, this shows six Gable Terminals.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 71-76, which show Hip and Ridge Terminals. Three of the illustrations are Terminals and the other three are Deck Corner Block.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company Finials
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 78-81, which show five Finials.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 82-86, which show a drawing of the Plan of Valley, Perspective of Valley, Section Through Roof, Flashing, and Enlarged Section of Valley.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 87-90, which shows D-1 Tile on Open Steel Construction. The following is a detailed drawing of Elevation of One Bay Between Two Trusses, Section of Line AB of Elevation Showing Half of Truss, Portion of Truss Showing Starting Courses, and Flashing Upright Work.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
This illustration shows Detroit Roofing Tile Company figures 91-94, which shows Details of Valley for Open Wood and Steel Construction. The following is a detailed drawing of Plan of Valley, Section of Trussed Valley, Section of a Valley for Open Wood Construction, and Section of a Valley with a Beam.

Showing a Method for Fastening Tile on Closed Construction

Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Drive a one inch staple into sheathing directly underneath lug of tile. Fasten wire to tile before laying. Run the wire through staple, lay tile in place. Then draw wire tight and wind around nail driven into strip at left side of tile.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Showing Effect of D-2 Tile
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Showing Effect of D-4 Tile
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Showing Effect of D-5 Tile
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Showing Effect of D-7 Tile

Showing Interior View of Roof D-1 Tiles Laid on Open Wood Construction

Detroit Roofing Tile Company

Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Detroit, Mich. D-6 Dull Green Glaze. Chittenden & Kotting, Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Detroit, Mich. (D-4 red). Malcomson & Higgenbotham, Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Grosse Pointe, Mich. (D-5 red). C. H. Bennett, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Cleveland, Ohio. (D-5 red). Harry Cone, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Detroit, Mich. (D-1 red). W. E. N. Hunter, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Terrace Cleveland, Ohio. (D-1 red). E. G. Hatch, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Grosse Pointe, Mich. Watt & Crane, Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Double Residence Detroit, Mich. Louis Kamper, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Grosse Pointe, Mich. Wm. S. Joy & Co., Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Detroit Mich. Spier, Rohns & Gehrke, Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Residence Detroit, Mich. B. C. Wetzel & Co., Archts.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
High School Corunna, Mich. Edwyn A. Bowd, Archt.
Detroit Roofing Tile Company
Detroit Roofing Tile Company Factory, Springwells, Detroit.